I will continue to cover more things on my previous research, about what to eat, how to sleep, how to exercise while pregnant and how it can affect the child.

Eating
    Some foods are recommended not to be consumed while pregnant due to the high chance of being contained with harmful bacteria. (1)
These include:
* Raw fish, high-mercury fish
* Under cooked/raw/processed meat
* Organ meat
* Raw or under cooked eggs
* Unpasteurized milk products, soft cheeses
* Unpasteurized juices
* Raw sprouts (1,2)
    But during this time, women need to consume around 300 extra calories per day. (3) So what would be beneficial? Of course a balanced diet with lots of fruits, vegetables, healthy fats, oils and grains is ideal for any human being, but a pregnant woman needs to consume more calcium, folic acid, iron and protein than average.
Here’s short reasons why:
* Calcium -> used to build baby’s bones and teeth
* Folic acid = B vitamin -> help prevent birth defects in baby's brain and spinal cord (neural tube defects)
* Iron -> make more blood to supply the baby with oxygen
* Protein -> build baby’s organs (4)

Sleep
1. Don’t sleep on back
Reason:
The abdomen rests on the woman’s intestines and major blood vessels. To rest like this becomes more uncomfortable over time and could cause:
* backaches
* breathing issues
* digestive problems
* low blood pressure
* hemorrhoids
* decrease circulation to heart and baby (5,6)
* Pillows are recommended to sleep on in this position.
2. Sleep on side
Reasons:
- helps to breathe and decrease pressure on uterus
- sleep on the left side = keep uterus off liver, more blood and nutrients reach baby and placenta
- knees bent = help the heart (5,6)
3. Don’t sleep on stomach
Reasons:
- it’s hard because the abdomen is changing (6)

Here’s a high quality picture
Sleeping Positions During Pregnancy(6)

Exercise
Exercise in moderation can be very beneficial to an expecting woman. It can improve posture, prevent gestational diabetes, relieve stress (might probably look into that later), and overall help to ease the delivery and labor. Oh yeah and help with backache and fatigue.
Just don’t overdo it. (7)


Resources:
(1) https://www.canada.ca/en/publi...ating-pregnancy.html
(2) https://www.healthline.com/nut...-pregnancy#section12
(3) http://americanpregnancy.org/p...et-during-pregnancy/
(4) https://www.livescience.com/45090-pregnancy-diet.html
(5) https://www.healthline.com/hea...illows-for-your-back
(6) http://americanpregnancy.org/p...ns-during-pregnancy/
(7) https://www.webmd.com/baby/gui...ise-during-pregnancy


Original Post

Hi Leonarda! 

Good job on your research round! You did amazing on how you presented your information in a way that can be easily read. You separated your research into three main categories which made it very clear. It’s great how you explained how choices that women make when they are pregnant deeply affect the life of her child. I specifically enjoyed how you did explanations on why you shouldn’t be doing a certain thing (ex. Eating raw fish and sleeping on your back). For instance, I knew that processed meat isn’t recommended to be consumed while pregnant; however, I never delved into the question “why?”. As a result, many people simply are aware of why we shouldn’t or why should eat certain foods. You did an awesome explanation! One suggestion I may add is that, if you are interested, to investigate how the child develops in the womb. I believe that doing such research and help you link what occurs in the inside (the womb) to what she does on the outside. It would help make the connection between why and how a certain action done by the mother (ex. What she consumes) effects the child. Another concept you may want to investigate are factors such as maternal smoking, depression and stress during pregnancy. It would be interesting to find out how it effects the development of a child. It is evident that there are effects, but it would be interesting to find out the strongest point of impact (ex. Low birth weights, health problems). Moreover, you may be interested in adding and investigating into some myths and statistics.  

For your future rounds, I suggest you add on the bottom what you are going to be researching during the next round! I have really enjoyed following you on your research, and I believe this would helpful to the readers to generate better suggestions in helping you furthering you research. Other than that, you did a formidable job, and I can’t wait until your next post. 

 

Websites to look into: 

http://www.child-encyclopedia....atal-nutrition-child  

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/ba...h_effects/pregnancy/  

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3581096/  

 

Good luck! 

Alison 😉 

Hey Leonarda, 

Interesting research post on pregnancy development with the do's and don'ts for expecting mothers. I never knew before how difficult it may be when pregnant because I assumed there were some restrictions but sleeping on your back was quite eyeopening to me. In this post, you explained how having a healthy diet, sleeping positions and amount of exercise is important; however, I'm curious if the mother's mental health would have an effect on the baby? Meaning, if the mother is suffering from an anxiety disorder while being pregnant would that negatively effect the baby in any way? Overall, a great research round and I can't wait to read what you come up with next! Here are some links for the future.

 https://www.webmd.com/baby/new...lth-affect-pregnancy

https://medicalxpress.com/news...ffect-pregnancy.html

Hey Leonarda,

I liked your research this week, it was very informative! As someone who has never really given much thought to pregnancy and children in general, your research is showing me that I really don't know much about pregnancy and the dangers that we can unintentionally expose ourselves to when pregnant. I think it would be neat if you talked about symptoms of pregnancy (like here) and how teenage pregnancy vs. mature pregnancy can impact the children.

Your research reminded me of a story we heart about in history with how a patient who had been in a vegetative state for around 20 years ended up recently giving birth, and none of the doctors had even known that the woman in question was pregnant. Your research sort of reminded me of that story, and if you're interested in reading more about it you can find it here

Good luck with your research, I look forward to reading what you uncover!
-Joanna

Hey Leonarda! 

Well done on all the information you have shared. Reading this made me realize that I am not fully aware of the small rules pregnant women must follow to reduce risks! I learned a lot in this round, like how pregnant women can't sleep on their backs! For future rounds, you could also incorporate the effects of the fetus, but maybe how negative attributes like smoking effects the child. 

Job well done!

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