Earthquakes in California

Hey guys its long since i posted and today i will be looking on more about earthquakes in California.

                          Earthquakes in California.

 

The magnitude 8.2 earthquake that ravaged southern Mexico on Sept. 7 was the largest to shake the country in nearly a century.Like California, Mexico is a seismically active region that has seen smaller earthquakes that have caused death and destruction. But the Sept. 7 temblor is a reminder that even larger earthquakes which ware rare  occur.Scientists say it’s possible for Southern California to be hit by a magnitude 8.2 earthquake. Such a quake would be far more destructive to the Los Angeles area because the San Andrea's fault runs very close to and underneath densely populated areas.

The devastating earthquakes that hit California over the last century were far smaller than the Sept. 7 temblor, which Mexican authorities set at magnitude 8.2 and the U.S. Geological Survey placed at 8.1. Mexico’s earthquake produced four times more energy than the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake, a magnitude 7.8, which killed 3,000 people and sparked a fire that left much of the city in ruins.

A magnitude 8.2 earthquake would rupture the San Andrea's fault from the Salton Sea  close to the Mexican border  all the way to Monterrey County. The fault would rupture through counties including Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernadine.

An 8.2 earthquake would be far worse here because the San Andrea's fault runs right through areas such as the Coachella Valley home to Palm Springs and the San Bernardo Valley, along with the San Gabriel Mountains north of Los Angeles. The fault is about 30 miles from downtown Los Angeles.

                     Southern California could be isolated.

Southern California could be isolated for some time, with the region surrounded by mountains and earthquake faults. The Cajun Pass  the gap between the San Gabriel and San Bernardo mountains through which Interstate 15 is built, and the main route to Las Vegas is also home to the San Andrea's fault and a potentially explosive mix of pipelines carrying gasoline and natural gas, and overhead electricity lines.All it would take is for the fuel line to break and a spark to create an explosion. “The explosion results in a crater,” the report says.

Power could be restored within hours in other states, the scenario said. But restoring power in Southern California could take several days.There could be up to 100,000 landslides, scientists say, based off how many landslides have occurred in past magnitude 7.8 earthquakes. “The really big earthquakes … are much more destabilizing to the hillsides.

That's why seismologists talk about the southern part of the state being due, or even overdue, for another big earthquake, she said.It's reasonable for California to be concerned about earthquake hazard and the 'big one' as it's only a question of time. Earthquakes are unpredictable though, so the when and where are very difficult to say and we can only talk in terms of 'likelihood."

Andrews concluded: "Anniversaries of big events, as well as smaller felt earthquakes, are great reminders that we should take measures to be prepared for the earthquake.They don't happen like clockwork, nor do they happen with the same frequency on different sections of the fault, Andrews said. However, the average time between quakes tends to be on the order of 100 to a few hundred years, and in several places it has been about that interval since the last large quake

Here are some links that helped me to get into the details;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...quakes_in_California.

http://scedc.caltech.edu/recent/Quakes/quakes0.html.

My next research will be on earthquakes formation.

 

 

 

 

Original Post

Hi Wallace,

Neat research about earthquakes! Reading about the devastation large earthquakes can cause makes me grateful that I've never experienced any major earthquakes, and I hope I never will. We get small earthquakes in Vancouver sometimes, but they're so small I almost never notice them, and they don't happen that often. However, I sure hope that they aren't a sign of a bigger earthquake that's to come. 

Here are some websites you can use for your research on the formation of earthquakes:

http://eschooltoday.com/natura...rthquakes-occur.html

https://www.britannica.com/science/earthquake-geology

Good luck!

Wow...This is a chic research i like the way you have organized your research hence being very informative openly.When i look at the buildings in California they have rare tall building and i thought that this guys are poor or their country do not afford architecture to build this tall luxurious building and it when i came to learn that the earthquake causes so.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/g...rthquakes_rev3.shtml

Hope this will help.

Hey Wallace, 

Great research round about earthquakes in California. It surprises me that California has been greatly impacted by earthquakes because Vancouver isn't that far away and thankfully we haven't experienced anything to the same degree. Perhaps looking into where earthquakes commonly take place can help your next post on formations. If earthquakes form in particular countries on certain surfaces, scientists can hopefully prevent devastating earthquakes in other places that fit the same criteria. This might seem a little far fetched, but preventing natural disasters before they happen is something that could save many lives. I look forward to your next round of research.

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