Opal Patil (Johnston Heights)

For my last round of this shortened cycle, I'll be focusing on a relatively recent global superpower. This nation is interesting, considering it has its roots within anti-imperialism. It is also one of the only nations where communist theory (in some form) has been practiced. Before I start, these are the 6 cycles within Glubb's system that I'll be using: The Age of Pioneers (Outburst) The Age of Conquests The Age of Commerce The Age of Affluence The Age of Intellect The Age of Decadence The...Read More...
Last Reply By Seth Young (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
In this research round, I’ll be looking at the key differences between empires and nations. This will be essential to understand, as it will help with applying John Glubb’s empire life cycle system onto nations. There are a few aspects that hold the most differences between these two systems; the distribution of power, culture, and economics. This isn’t an in depth look at the differences, only a comparison encompassing surface level ideas 1. The Distribution of Power: The management of...Read More...
Last Reply By Priscilla Muthoni (Sweetwaters) · First Unread Post
As I continue along this cycle, I must first take a look and understand John Glubb’s empire cycles (the 6 changes of emphasis within the empire). To reiterate, this is what they are: • The Age of Pioneers (Outburst) • The Age of Conquests • The Age of Commerce • The Age of Affluence • The Age of Intellect • The Age of Decadence In this research round, I’ll be trying to look at and give a slight explanation of each age. 1. The Age of Pioneers (Outburst): The age of pioneers represents an age...Read More...
Last Reply By Priscilla Muthoni (Sweetwaters) · First Unread Post
For my third round of research, I’ll take a rather short look at a country that used to exist relatively recently. This will be a test round of Glubb’s empire theory. I’ll be specifically looking for differences between the expected life cycle and actual events. To reiterate, these are the 6 cycles within an empire: • The Age of Pioneers (Outburst) • The Age of Conquests • The Age of Commerce • The Age of Affluence • The Age of Intellect • The Age of Decadence The life of South Vietnam is...Read More...
Last Reply By Nasib Mohamed (Sweetwaters) · First Unread Post
Automation based Society The primary goal of an economy based on Automation is to distribute basic goods (that are readily available with little to no cost) on a national level using wide-spread automation. The government (and possibly other organizations) are in direct control of this form of economy. Most citizens would live in a post work society, as manual labor wouldn’t be needed (although many will still retain high position/non automatable jobs). The following goes over how this will...Read More...
Last Reply By Cynthia Weldon (Teacher/Admin) · First Unread Post
Before I go on to try and “forecast” an economic system based on radical automation, I have to take a look at what we currently have today. The economic principles used vary country by country, but most free-market and democratic countries follow a system of mixed economies. These economies have primarily capitalistic tendencies with other economic strategies included within it. While researching this though, I also learned about “heterodox economies”, which is why I want to compare the two.Read More...
Last Reply By Jim Liu (Charles Best) · First Unread Post
As a worker’s job gets replaced, there will need to be a way to support a fund individuals whose jobs have been displaced by automation. One way to do such a thing is taxing robots (or automation taxation). This theory has recently come to light in part of Bill Gate’s discussion of it and a recent European Union discussion of it. Taxes are usually given to workers and businesses to use for state funding. A lot of these funds translate to things like hospitals, libraries, and other utilities...Read More...
Last Reply By Erica Won (LFAS) · First Unread Post
Project Cybersyn was an automated support system that had the goal of managing and analyzing economic data for the Chilean government around the 1970’s. While it did not have negative effects generally caused by automation, it served as a way to monitor and understand economies in a self-operating and even self-regulating way. The Chilean socialist government of the time needed a way to create a centralized network to monitor businesses. This would be beneficial to achieving their goal of a...Read More...
One concept that comes up frequently when mentioning any type of industrial or scientific revolution is the concept of a Post-Scarcity economy. A Post-Scarcity economy is an economy where it is assumed that basic human items can be provided at a very low cost and high abundance. This would mean that things like food and shelter could be provided for almost (or maybe completely) free. Post-Scarcity economies can be brought about through many things, though automation is where I will focus on.Read More...
My inquiry question “How will radical automation affect politics and economics in the future?” talks about the effects of human replacement. In a future where more and more things become automated, governments will have to deal with the displacement of a human work force (particularly in manual labour). To discuss this, there are certain definitions that need to be understood first. Definitions: • Automation: In this context, automation is a machine or system that is autonomous in its goal.Read More...
After doing my round of research, I’ve come to the conclusion that the argument of Syntax versus Semantics is the most import factor of the Artificial Intelligence debate. Here are my thoughts for both of the two arguments. AI is not possible: As a computer, there is no way for code to interpret meaning. How would a machine be able to look at itself and then have the ability to change its own fundamentals and design without any external intervention? Sure, machines are efficient and...Read More...
Last Reply By Jordan McKenzie (LFAS) · First Unread Post
Instead of picking out and siding with weather Artificial Intelligence (AI) exists or doesn't exist, I decided to use this round to look at a form of AI called Synthetic Intelligence (SI). Synthetic Intelligence is factually a form of AI, since both SI and AI require human intervention to create AI. The inherent differences appear when it comes to how intelligence is viewed. Artificial Intelligence states that intelligence is the ability to mimic and think in similar to ways to how humans...Read More...
Last Reply By Ben Laird (LFAS) · First Unread Post
(Before I start this round, I have to take the time to thank Ben and Adithya for the links they provided in my last research round. It was a huge help for this round’s topic.) Computationalism is a theory which states that thinking is a form of computation (specifically when looking at the human brain). This idea relates to cognitive computation specifically, where computers are designed to “learn” and “understand” similar to how the human mind does. In relation to my last round of research,...Read More...
Last Reply By Adithya Baskar (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
The Chinese Room argument is an argument by John Searle against Alan Turing’s AI test. The main idea stated is that: Syntax (structure) and Semantics (meaning) are two separate concepts that AI can only partially understand. AI can understand syntax due to its mechanical properties, though AI can’t properly understand semantics because of how symbolic and abstract it may be. The simplified version of the Chinese Room is presented like this: A man sits in a room who cannot communicate in...Read More...
Last Reply By Adithya Baskar (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
In this round, I'll cover why Artificial Intelligence isn't possible for my inquiry question ( Is Artificial Intelligence possible?) Mechanism is a philosophy that dictates that living things are machine-like in existence, bounded together by seemingly unrelated parts that function together. A simplified way of thinking about this concept is imagining a pile of junk. The hypothetical junk is made of different materials, though overtime they bond with each other. As the junk takes shape,...Read More...
Last Reply By Adithya Baskar (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
For my first cycle, I'll look at the differences between strong AI and weak AI, as well as go over the concept of technological singularity. Weak AI and Strong AI are different classifications of artificial intelligence. Weak AI is generally referred to as situational AI or simulated rather than sentient. Weak AI usually requires a lot of preprogramming and usually cannot adapt on a large scale to solve a problem. It only is trained to "simulate" human thought, only replicating the results...Read More...
Last Reply By Flora Xia (LFAS) · First Unread Post
After finishing my 5 th round of research, I wondered to myself: “Why haven’t I been hearing about ideologies at all?” It might have just been ignorance or lack of understanding, though I don’t see much mention of it in main stream media. Ideologies seemed extremely prevalent during the 20 th century, so how will these concepts affect us in the 21 st century? Could we see shifts in the established structures of today? I’ll be taking a look at this today. Note: This isn’t a prediction of any...Read More...
Last Reply By Moira O'Keeffe (LFAS) · First Unread Post
Today I’ll finally be doing one of my final steps in my ideology project: empirically judging and rating systems. In my last post, I talked about the 6 point scale I will be using. In his post, I’ll talk a little bit more about what I’ll be judging as well as giving scores and explaining why. For now, I’ll be primarily focusing on Capitalism and communism. While I intentionally wanted to do other ideologies, I realized that I only properly understood the aforementioned two. I’ll possibly do...Read More...
Last Reply By Cynthia Weldon (Teacher/Admin) · First Unread Post
For my last two posts, I covered the economic and cultural benefits of ideologies, specifically collectivism and individualism. Now that I have established small examples regarding the differences and functions between ideologies, I’ll be finally moving onto learning about real world ideologies and situations. Before I start to judge an ideology or find its strength and weaknesses, I need to create a kind of system to judge and empirically “score” each ideology. This task will be heavily...Read More...
Last Reply By Cynthia Weldon (Teacher/Admin) · First Unread Post
In my previous post, I talked about the economic benefits of collective versus individualistic ideologies. Today, I’m moving onto part two: cultural differences and why an individual might be attracted to each side. Because political policies and culture is much less linear than systematic economics, I’ll have to constantly shift between discussing both sides rather than simply giving a rundown of each side. Let’s begin. The difference in culture lies between how these respective governments...Read More...
Last Reply By Audrey Heath (Charles Best) · First Unread Post
Before I give my thoughts, the groundwork must be established for ideologies and morality. Ideologies (in this context) are social, cultural, and economic policies that are a philosophical basis to a national's system. Some examples of ideologies include communism, fascism, and capitalism. Ideologies tend to fall in either liberal or authoritarian in economics, while culturally they follow another axis (left-wing or right-wing). Though due to socio-economics, both axis are present in...Read More...
Last Reply By Danielle Campani (LFAS) · First Unread Post
my previous round of research, I talked about the differences between the culture/politics of an ideology versus the economic attributes. Moreover, I brushed over a few examples of ideologies and the concepts behind them (giving a few comparisons between collectivism and individualism). In an effort to delve further into the differences between them, I noted how I needed to explore what factors make an ideology attractive. I’ll be covering that aspect today for economics. The purpose of an...Read More...
My inquiry question asks whether socio-economic and cultural ideologies are in any sense, "good or bad". The objective is to find out if an ideology can be made with negative intent, and if an ideology can be ranked in objectivity or positive vs. negative perceptions. I will be going through websites and videos that primarily document the opinions of different ideologies and how they change over time. Further more, I'll be learning about the ideologies themselves (such as communism, fascism,...Read More...
Last Reply By Adithya Baskar (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
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