Nazaha Muntafi (Johnston Heights)

“You’re beautiful,” Clive Wearing told his wife Deborah while beaming like a newlywed. Deborah was delighted. However, she knew that if she left the room and returned, Clive would act in the same manner. Clive Wearing was a well-known British conductor until in 1985, at the age of 47, he contracted a rare virus that damaged his central nervous system. This occurred almost six months after his wedding to Deborah and since then he is unable to recall much of his past and cannot create new...Read More...
Last Reply By Sophie Holland (LFAS) · First Unread Post
Memory Memory has always been a fascinating subject to people. Most people picture memory as a place to store information. This metaphor has become a part of the study of memories. People talk about storing memories or organizing their thoughts; similar sayings all link to the metaphor. Plato imagined memory as an aviary while Aristotle compared it to a wax tablet. St. Augustine of Hippo even found similarities between memories and caves! Due to the fact that memory formation cannot be...Read More...
Last Reply By Erica Won (LFAS) · First Unread Post
Name of the Article: "Higher body mass index is associated with episodic memory deficits in young adults" Publisher: NCBI National Center for Biotechnology Information Date of publication: February 22, 2016 (online) Authors: Lucy G. Cheke, Jon S. Simons and Nicola S. Clayton Summary: Episodic memory is the capability to store, preserve and retrieve accounts of events of a person’s own life. Evidence has shown that obesity and other related health disorders can contribute to the change in...Read More...
The topic of my first research cycle for this academic year is “memory.” The inquiry question I will be pursuing is “What factors that are dependent on human individuality affect memory recall?” Before proceeding to answer my question, I will use my first research round to explain what episodic memories are. My second research round will briefly summarize how these memories are formed. From there, I will explain what I consider to be human individuality and categorize these unique...Read More...
Last Reply By Mr Szutu (Teacher - Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
Health Related Side Effects Associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Due to the nature of their work, forensic scientists may suffer from PTSD. Post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, is a mental illness that involves being exposed to a traumatic event such as death or injury. It is also possible for PTSD to be caused by emotional trauma such as an abusive relationship (“Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD),” 2016). People who suffer from PTSD often have vivid nightmares, flashbacks...Read More...
Last Reply By Jim Liu (Charles Best) · First Unread Post
Stress Faced by Forensic Scientists Stress can be emotional, mental and even physical tension that is caused by either internal or external factors such as anxiety or overwork (Richman, 2014). Therefore, stress can be thought of as a negative method that a person uses to deal with environmental pressures and demands. Considering that the livelihoods of forensic scientists depend heavily on criminal activities such as murder and violence, it is expected that coping with such horrendous events...Read More...
Last Reply By Priscilla Muthoni (Sweetwaters) · First Unread Post
As mentioned above, my inquiry questions is, “How are our memories affected by different aspects of our environment?" To begin this inquiry, I will be researching what the word 'memory' refers to. From there, I will look into how memories are made. Returning to my original question, I will investigate the factors that affect how we retrieve information. I will also research how a person's past affects who they are at the present. Childhood trauma will also be included in one of my research...Read More...
Last Reply By Trizah Gatuiri (Sweetwaters) · First Unread Post
The Effects of Stress on Forensic Scientists Forensic scientists are endlessly answering the many questions that arise from criminal activity by analyzing evidence found at crime scenes. The work of forensic scientists is continuously becoming more complex and diverse. However, due to the nature of their work, forensic technicians are often exposed to disturbing scenes that may cause them to experience stress. This post will discuss how stress affects mental health and the stress faced by...Read More...
Last Reply By Danica Rogers (Charles Best) · First Unread Post
Job Profile of Forensic Scientists Forensic scientists, also known as criminalists, assist in investigating crimes by analyzing physical evidence from crime scene. They provide impartial evidence to be used in courts to support the prosecution or defense during trials (AGCAS editors, 2016). This post will provide a brief summary of the job description of forensic scientists including their responsibilities, education and qualifications. The General Duties of Forensic Scientists The primary...Read More...
Last Reply By Erica Won (LFAS) · First Unread Post
The topic of my fourth research cycle is the ‘mental health of forensic scientists.’ The inquiry question I will be pursuing is “How does the environment within which forensic scientists operate in affect their mindset and mental health?” My teacher for this cycle is Ms Weldon. To begin my research, I will be first looking into the general and specialized tasks of forensic scientists to better understand their workplace. In one of my posts, I will be including what a typical day of a...Read More...
Last Reply By Taryn Trefanenko (Charles Best-Alumni) · First Unread Post
The Immune System’s Relation to Personality The immune system, responsible for protecting the human body from diseases, may also have an impact on a person’s temperament. This notion was the basis of my inquiry question. In my previous posts I have examined how the immune system works and its ability to fight infections. I have also researched how the immune system may harm an individual. For the last research post of my third cycle, I will be discussing how the immune system affects a...Read More...
Last Reply By Kalith Nanayakkara (JH - Alumni) · First Unread Post
Diseases that Affect the Immune System The immune system defends the body from infections and other disease causing microorganisms. It is made of specialized cells, tissues and organs. When the immune system isn’t functioning correctly it is called an immune system disorder. According to an article reviewed by Blaivas, Allen J. (DO) and Brown, Kim (APRN), a person who has an immune system disorder may be born with a weak immune system; this is known as primary immune deficiency (2017). They...Read More...
Last Reply By Aiswarya Alagusunder (JH alumni) · First Unread Post
The Innate Defense System The immune system is responsible for protecting the body from disease-causing microorganisms. The human body had two levels of defenses against these microorganisms: the innate (nonspecific) defense and the adaptive defense. The following post discusses the roles of the outer barriers, lymphocytes and other responses of the innate defense system designed to protect the human body from foreign pathogens. Physical Barriers The human body has many security measures in...Read More...
Last Reply By Aiswarya Alagusunder (JH alumni) · First Unread Post
The Immune System Since ancient times, people have observed that the human body has the power to defend itself against certain diseases. This is due to our immune systems which protect us from harmful proteins and disease-causing microorganisms. This post examines the importance of the immune system, its ability to identify harmful pathogens and gives a brief overview on the two defences of the immune system. The Role of the Immune System The human body is constantly in contact with various...Read More...
Last Reply By Aiswarya Alagusunder (JH alumni) · First Unread Post
The topic for my third research cycle is ‘the immune system.’ From my topic I formulated the inquiry question for this cycle which is ‘how does the immune system differ between individuals?’ My teacher for this cycle will be Ms Weldon. Although I do not know where my inquiry will take me, I have a general plan of action for this cycle. To begin my research, I will be looking into how the immune system works and how it affects us. From there I will be collecting information on what makes our...Read More...
Last Reply By Aiswarya Alagusunder (JH alumni) · First Unread Post
The Cellular Immune Response The innate immune response uses the skin and mucous membranes to ensure that disease causing pathogens do not enter the human body. On the other hand, the role of the adaptive immune response is to eliminate foreign microorganisms that may have entered the body. However, many pathogens may be able to elude these preliminary defenses and breach the cells in the human body. When these cells have been infected, abnormalities start to appear. Antibodies, being unable...Read More...
Last Reply By Danica Rogers (Charles Best) · First Unread Post
How Are Our Memories Affected by Different Aspects of Our Environment? Memory is a key part of our identity. It helps us remember the past and make decisions for the future. However, memories can be altered or forgotten depending on many factors. This research post summaries my previous research on memory formation and how certain elements in our environment can affect memory recall. Processing of Memory In Saul McLeod’s article “Stages of Memory” (2013) she states, “Memory is the term given...Read More...
Last Reply By Nicole Shimmin (Johnston Heights-Alumni) · First Unread Post
Amnesia and its Effects on Memory Amnesia usually refers to the partial or total loss of memory due to trauma or injury to specific areas of the brain. According to Zoran Minderovic (2014) , “Amnesia is a dissociative psychological disorder manifested by total or partial loss of memory and usually caused by a trauma.” This research post investigates what causes amnesia, its effects and diagnosis. Causes The cause of amnesia determines the type of amnesia. Zoran (2014) states in his research...Read More...
Last Reply By Aiswarya Alagusunder (JH alumni) · First Unread Post
My plan for this week was to find information on the different disorders that affects brains and hampers the abilities to make memories. While conducting my research, I decided to collect more information on how we lay down memories first, specifically long term memories. Most experiences we have usually leave no permanent trace. However, some experiences are so striking that they forge new connections between neurons and therefore alter the structure of our brains. Only experiences that...Read More...
Last Reply By Aiswarya Alagusunder (JH alumni) · First Unread Post
The Hippocampus The hippocampus is one of the several parts of the brain that plays an important role in memory formation. Rita Carter (2009) stated in her research that the primary functions of the hippocampus include memory formation and recall as well as spatial awareness. This research post investigates the hippocampal structure and functions. Structure According to an excerpt from The World of Anatomy and Physiology (2007), the hippocampus is a part of the limbic system (the limbic...Read More...
Last Reply By Kalith Nanayakkara (JH - Alumni) · First Unread Post
My inquiry question is "How are our memories affected by different aspects of our environment?" For this week's post, I have researched a little bit about the different types of memories. To review, memory is a term that describes a number of different brain functions. The most common feature of these different brain functions involves recreating past experiences. I also discussed in my last research round the difference between long and short term memories. There are five different types of...Read More...
Last Reply By Sophie Offei (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
For this cycle, my inquiry question is "How are our memories affected by different aspects of our environment?" For this week, my research defines what memories are. According to the Oxford Dictionary, memory is "the power that the mind has to store and remember information." In psychology, memory is a term that describes any structures and processes that aid in the storage as well as the retrieval of information. Memory is an essential part of our lives. Odd as it may be, our memories of...Read More...
Last Reply By Sophie Offei (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
My inquiry question is "What is intuition?" However, the question I want to answer is "How can we train our intuition?" This is the final round of research for this cycle and I will use what I have learnt previously for this week's research. It is extremely difficult to learn how to train and control intuition as we do not have a complete understanding of what intuition is. Despite this, we have realized that intuition can be immensely helpful and perhaps even save lives. The US military has...Read More...
Last Reply By Audrey Heath (Charles Best) · First Unread Post
When I first decided that my inquiry question would be "What is intuition?" the actual topic I wanted to pursue is "How can we train our intuition?" For this week, I have researched about the intuitive nature of children to learn more about how to nurture it. In my previous research posts, I had written that Malcolm Gladwell views intuition as our brain making rapid decisions without letting our consciousness understand the whole process. However, intuition is also viewed as a personality...Read More...
Last Reply By Finley MacAlpine (JH-Alumni) · First Unread Post
For this week's research for my Inquiry Question "What is intuition?" I will be looking into how cultural stigma affects our use of intuition. As I mentioned before, I have been reading the book Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell. Throughout the book, Gladwell (2005) views 'intuition' as "snap judgements and rapid cognition [that] take place behind a locked door" (p. 51). The 'locked door' that Malcolm Gladwell mentions is the part of our unconscious that we...Read More...
Last Reply By Opal Patil (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
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