Aiesha Trivino

RR #3: Hello everyone, for today's post I will be focusing on the comparison between Qing Dynasty fashion (1644-1912) and our modern day fashion. As the Manchu Qing dynasty (Manchu was once an ethnic minority) to rise, it caused a widespread change to society. One of the major aspects changed within the process of it all, was the fashion of society. The styles of men and women, rich or poor, changed. Soon the Qipao was new traditional dress worn by women. The Qipao we know today is very...Read More...
Last Reply By Seth Young (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
Hello everyone and welcome to the introduction to my final cycle of the year. For this cycle, I will be wrapping up all the work I have done this year to summarize all my findings. The main goal I have for this cycle is to find the traits that would be best for my final project! For each trait, I present I will be speaking of a modern day equivalent. So, to begin this short four-part cycle, my first trait will be the common dress lengths and styles found in the Victorian era and the Qing...Read More...
Last Reply By Cynthia Weldon (Teacher/Admin) · First Unread Post
Hello everyone!! This will be my final post of the year, and I would like to use it as an opportunity to thank you all for your support and comments because it means the world to me ! also I just wanted to make a few points of the main topics I would like you all to take away from this year long(continues next year) cycle of work! So here we go and reminisce the posts I have made throughout the year! Cycle #1: RR#2: " Also if you were pale, considered beautiful, and in a high-class you would...Read More...
Last Reply By Adithya Baskar (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
Welcome to my second research round of this cycle! Today I will be focusing on the comparison between one of the most important parts to any garment; the fabric. Today, we still use and have the same fabrics they had during the Victorian era and Qing dynasty, however, many in poorer quality. In the time of the Victorian era and the Qing dynasty, the type of cloth you used for your clothing determine your class. For example, Pure silks, Velvet and satin were worn only by the wealthy as they...Read More...
Last Reply By Tiana Andjelic (Charles Best) · First Unread Post
C3RR6: As many of you may know already, the Victorian era was very well known for being systematic. All things done were done accordingly to what socially acceptable and it was rare for anyone to go against this social norm. However, in the rare occasion that one did go against what was considered ‘normal’ were considered to be mentally ill, in other words, insane. I know it may seem a bit extreme but there’s a reason behind this. This mindset society had was drilled into their mind at a...Read More...
Last Reply By Jim Liu (Charles Best) · First Unread Post
So for todays post I will be providing some updates in regards to my final project! I am currently in the final design stages I will be fabric shopping very soon So right now I am currently finalizing my design however the creation process wont begin until the next school year. This is because my textiles teacher is currently on maternity leave and I do not want to start creating without her guidance. However, I will be updating you all if there are any changes!Read More...
Last Reply By Lauren Jang (Charles Best) · First Unread Post
C3RR4: Hello everyone, I hope you have all been well! For todays post I will continue on with the relationship between Victorian era women and anorexia. For this post, I will expand more on the concept of ‘fasting girls’. A brief overview of what I brought up last post, fasting girls are young girls and women who did not eat or drink water (fasted) for extended periods of time. This concept is fairly similar to restrictive anorexia nervosa, where one would purposely limit their food intake...Read More...
Last Reply By Nazaha Muntafi (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
Hello Everyone! So as I continue on with my research, I have found that for this cycle in particular, I will be doing my best to focus on digging deeper into the information I find. So for example I will be looking more into expanding on the connection between anorexia and Victorian era women. I realized that it would be best to expand on one connection instead of multiple connections being made, but none are very in depth. So lets continue on! So continuing from where I last left off, I...Read More...
Last Reply By Jim Liu (Charles Best) · First Unread Post
Todays post is focused solely on the Victorian era. Within the Victorian era, the media sent out mixed signals to the women of the era. Some papers would advertise healthy diets and lifestyles. while on the next page there would be an advertisement on how to gain, and maintain a tiny waist for the ideal ‘hourglass’ figure. Like today, society and the media were the main contributors to the standards of this era. Mothers raised their daughters according to how the media told them was best.Read More...
Last Reply By Takako Liu (LFAS) · First Unread Post
For this cycle, I would like to consider how the fashion and beauty standards of these eras affected the mental health of women. Using our modern beauty standard as an example, we have seen time and time again, examples of women being poorly affected by these standards we have for beauty. Women of the modern age have been faced with mental illnesses such as: Depression Eating Disorders Anxiety Disorders Stress Mental illnesses result from different causes such as genetics or trauma(1),...Read More...
C2RR6 Hello everyone! I apologize for all the confusion that arose from my previous post. For this post I will take sometime to explain that change and why I decided it would be best for me to change course in my research (for the time being). Why did your topic change so suddenly? I again apologize for all the confusion! However, the main reason why I changed my topic so suddenly was because I saw that I was not able to continue my topic for all 6 rounds of research. Along with that...Read More...
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Last Reply By Rosemary Makena (Sweetwaters) · First Unread Post
CCR5: For the last 4 posts I have posted for my second research round, they were all posts made surrounding my inquiry question: How does fashion and beauty during the Victorian era and the Qing dynasty of china impacts and affect the physical health of women? For these posts I focused on the physical effects they had on women and later I plan to focus more on their mental effects on the lives of these women who did such practices for the sake of beauty. However, after speaking of these...Read More...
Last Reply By Nazaha Muntafi (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
C2RR4: During my last post, I began to cover the practice of foot binding that occurred during Imperial China. To recap, foot binding was the process of breaking and bending a young girl’s feet to fit a tiny shoe. For this round, I will continue this topic and cover more of the practice itself and the process. To begin, the practice of foot binding was done on young girls from the ages of 4-6. It was done with young girls because they were believed to be the only age range that could with...Read More...
Last Reply By Nazaha Muntafi (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
C2RR3: Hello everyone! For this round of research, I will be focusing on the late practice of foot binding that took place in china for more than ten centuries. For those who may not know (I loosely spoke of this subject in my first cycle) foot biding is a practice that broke and reshaped the feet of young women to fit their feet into smaller shoes. *the comparison between the normal shape and size of a foot compared to the shoe that was worn after having your foot bound The first record of...Read More...
Last Reply By Kalith Nanayakkara (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
Research Post #2: Throughout my cycles, I will be posting 1 or 2 posts about the progress of my final project. So for my final project I plan to make a formal dress that fully encompasses the research I have done and the results I have found. This garment would be made using inspiration from both Victorian era and the Qing dynasty fashion. However, I will construct the garment with aspects of our modern fashion. This plan so far is still fairly rough and I plan to further discuss the details...Read More...
Last Reply By Nicole Shimmin (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
Research post #1: For my first post of this cycle, I want to begin with a topic that not many know, despite the fact that it is one of the most disturbing stories of the Victorian era; the romanticizing of tuberculosis within women. Marie Duplessis, was a young woman known for her exceptional beauty. She was a French courtesan and a Parisian celebrity. Marie had beautiful long glossy hair, rosy cheeks, red lips, pale skin, and a thin waist. Her beauty was known to be the ideal and very much...Read More...
Last Reply By Nazaha Muntafi (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
For this round of research I plan to continue on researching fashion and beauty throughout history, however, I will only find research from the years 1861-1901, of the Qing dynasty and Victorian era. I am only researching these two periods because it would allow me to compare fashion and beauty effects in two different parts of the world happening in the same time. Also taking in research from a smaller frame allows me to fully explore my options, without the results being to broad. Along...Read More...
The Qing Dynasty #3 (final): Within this dynasty, not a lot of information was recorded on their fashion and beauty standards. However, there are still many other practices that makes this dynasty unique. Within the early Qing Dynasty, the most common out fit of choice was the Traditional Jacket and skirt. However, in the middle to later parts of the era, many began to wear tight fitted pants underneath their skirts. Many women did not live with this opportunity to wear the clothing of their...Read More...
Last Reply By Nicole Shimmin (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
The Tang Dynasty #2 To achieve their desired look, women of the Tang dynasty would spend lots of time putting on their make-up in a very elaborate process. To begin their routine, women would first apply onto their face a white face powder made of rice (powder was used like how we use foundation). Then they would apply large amounts of rouge onto their cheeks. After, they would then, dust yellow powder onto their forehead. Women would then, paint on their eyebrows, using a bluish-black...Read More...
Last Reply By Nazaha Muntafi (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
Before I begin my second half of my first research question, I would like to thank everyone who wrote their suggestions, comments, and their input, on the first half of my research! You guys all really helped So as for my second half I will be focusing on three dynasties of china for their fashion and beauty trends for women. The three dynasties I’ve chosen to research for this half are: The Han Dynasty (206 BCE- 220 AD) The Tang Dynasty (618-907) The Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) And I will be...Read More...
Last Reply By Taryn Trefanenko (Charles Best) · First Unread Post
Research #3 (final) Women of the Victorian era choose dresses to be their main outfit of choice. Trends for dresses in this era changed almost every few years, however, the trends from the previous years were often reoccurring. During the Victorian era many types of dresses were worn, however the main types of dresses were divided into different eras: Pre- Hoop Skirt (1840-1855) Hoop Skirt (1856-1869) The Bustle (1869- 1876) The Natural Form (1877-1882) The Edwardian style (1900-1909) These...Read More...
Last Reply By DeOndre Grant (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
Research #2 This week, I am continuing my research on historical fashion and beauty trends and their implications for women's physical and mental health. The Queen was a very pale and considered to beautiful person, and because of it, many looked up to her beauty, making a pale natural complexion the ideal complexion of the era. Woman would paint there face to achieve the desired pale complexion, however, it often lead to have many health complications. Women would paint their face with...Read More...
Last Reply By Seth Young (Johnston Heights) · First Unread Post
After my first round of research I have found out many trends and standards the Victorian era had for woman. It all begins with Queen Victoria, despite her reign beginning at the young age of 18, she was a very strict woman. She believed she was responsible for making her country ‘respectable’ again. With her belief, came the beginning of a very strict, controlled future for the women of Britain. To begin, women were expected to ALWAYS wear corsets, not wearing one could result in a woman...Read More...
Last Reply By Yasmin Harden (Charles Best) · First Unread Post
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